Pope Francis carries palm fronds in procession at start of Palm Sunday Mass in St. Peter's Square at Vatican

By Brian & Ann Kolek, a Worldwide Marriage Encounter couple.

Globalization of Indifference is at the heart of Pope Francis’ Lenten
message, in which he urges us all to fight individualism with merciful
hearts that are more attentive to the needs of others.

Often times, when we live a healthy and comfortable lifestyle, we forget about
others. We are unconcerned with their problems, their sufferings and the
injustices they may be enduring – our hearts grow cold. Yet God does not
forget about us, he is not indifferent to our world. He so loves it that he gave
his Son for our salvation.

Lent is a time for letting Christ serve us so that we in turn may become more
like him and serve others. This happens whenever we hear the word of God
and receive the sacraments, especially the Eucharist. There we become what
we receive: the Body of Christ. And whoever is of Christ, belongs to this One
Body, and in this One Body, we cannot be indifferent to any part of it.

In Marriage Encounter we refer to our marriage as a Little Church. Jesus
resides in our Little Church. Our spouse, Christ and we share in this One Body.
1 Corinthians 12:26 says: “If one part suffers, all the parts suffer with it; if one
part is honored, all the parts share its joy.”

Holy Thursday, with its rite of washing of the feet, is a beautiful example of
how Christ wishes us to serve him by serving one another. It requires us to
humble ourselves to wash the feet of others, including those to whom we are
indifferent. But we must also humble ourselves and allow others to wash our
own feet.

PRIEST WASHES FEET OF MAN DRESSED AS APOSTLE ON HOLY THURSDAY AT PANAMA CHURCH

In my relationship with Brian, I’m guilty of indifference in our union in this
shared “One Body”. His difficult days at work are his; I’ve got my own to deal
with. His responsibilities around the home are his; again, I’ve got my own to
take care of. If he’s awoken at night with indigestion, it’s his own fault for
eating that rich meal too late in the day. If I think I’ve done my share and I’ve
got my act together, Brian needs to step up and catch up. In these moments,
I’m not humble by any means; I’m not washing Brian’s feet.

But Brian is a part of my body in this shared Body of Christ. I should no sooner
neglect a problem with a part of my own body than I should neglect Brian
when he’s feeling injured or wounded. If he is suffering and I don’t offer care,
then I suffer along with him.

But I must also humble myself and allow Brian to care for me as well. Being
too proud to ask for his help or brushing it aside when he offers is not
allowing him to have joy, which in turn denies joy to myself and our shared
body. In my times of need, I must open my heart and allow Brian to wash my
feet.

“The opposite of love is not hate – it’s indifference. The opposite of art is not
ugliness – it’s indifference. The opposite of faith is not heresy – it’s indifference.
And the opposite of life is not death – it’s indifference.”
― Elie Wiesel (author, activist, winner of 1986 Nobel Peace Prize)

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“If one part suffers, all the parts suffer with it;
if one part is honored, all the parts share its joy.”

Our dialogue question is: In what ways am I indifferent and neglect to wash
your feet?

For more information about Worldwide Marriage Encounter log onto: http://wwmema.org/

Photos courtesy of Catholic News Service.

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